Job Applicant’s Salary History Off the Table in the Interview Process

Recently, Mayor Bill de Blasio signed a bill into law that prohibits all New York City employers from inquiring about a job applicant’s salary history. The bill, Intro 1253, is an expansion of the Mayor’s original Executive Order 21 that was signed in November 2016 and includes both private and public employers. According to Mayor de Blasio this legislation seeks to combat the discriminatory pre-hiring procedures that negatively impact women and minorities. Continue reading “Job Applicant’s Salary History Off the Table in the Interview Process”

House Votes to Delay Updates to the Overtime Exemption Rules

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Recently, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to delay the Obama Administration’s revisions to the overtime exemption rules that were scheduled to go into effect December 1, 2016 until June 1, 2017. On May 17, 2016 the Obama Administration released their Final Rule to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The key update will be to the overtime exemption for full-time employees which will double the annual salary limit from less than $23,660 to $47,476, under which 4.2 million Americans would qualify for overtime pay. Currently, only 7 percent of full-time workers qualify for overtime pay. Continue reading “House Votes to Delay Updates to the Overtime Exemption Rules”

How Updates to the Overtime Exemption Rule Affect New York Businesses

Recently, the United States Department of Labor released the final updates to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), doubling the annual salary threshold from less than $23,660 to $47,476, under which most salaried employees fall. The update will extend overtime availability to 4.2 million workers to receive time-and-a-half wages for every hour they work beyond 40 hours a week. Continue reading “How Updates to the Overtime Exemption Rule Affect New York Businesses”