Proposed New York City Legislation Seeks to End Requirement of After-Hours Work Communications

New York business lawyerDo employees have the right to disconnect? Rafael Espinal, a New York City council member from Brooklyn, thinks so. On March 22, 2018, Councilman Espinal introduced a bill that would make it illegal for employers to require employees to access work-related communications when they are off duty, on vacation, using personal days, or off sick. These communications can include, but not limited to, emails, text messages, and instant messenger services. Continue reading “Proposed New York City Legislation Seeks to End Requirement of After-Hours Work Communications”

What Employers Need to Know About New York’s Anti-Discrimination Laws

New York employees are protected against employment discrimination under federal, state and local laws. Several federal laws extend protection against discrimination to employees. The most prominent law is Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII). Title VII prohibits employers from discriminating against employees based on sex, race, color, national origin, and religion. Both the New York State Human Rights Law (NYSHRL) and the New York City Human Rights Law (NYCHRL) extend employee protections to more categories than federal law. Continue reading “What Employers Need to Know About New York’s Anti-Discrimination Laws”

Job Applicant’s Salary History Off the Table in the Interview Process

Recently, Mayor Bill de Blasio signed a bill into law that prohibits all New York City employers from inquiring about a job applicant’s salary history. The bill, Intro 1253, is an expansion of the Mayor’s original Executive Order 21 that was signed in November 2016 and includes both private and public employers. According to Mayor de Blasio this legislation seeks to combat the discriminatory pre-hiring procedures that negatively impact women and minorities. Continue reading “Job Applicant’s Salary History Off the Table in the Interview Process”

New York Law to Protect Freelance Workers Goes Into Effect

Freelance Isn't Free Act business lawyerNew York City is the first city to implement a law to protect its 1.3 million freelance workers against nonpayment. The Freelance Isn’t Free Act (FIFA) mandates that employers sign a contract for freelance work that is valued at $800 or more, either for a single job or total services contracted within a 120-day period. The contracts must include the date the freelancer will receive payment; if they do not include the date of payment, businesses must compensate the freelancer within 30 days of completing the work. FIFA seeks to protect freelance workers against employer retaliation and can increase financial consequences for employers who violate the new rules. Continue reading “New York Law to Protect Freelance Workers Goes Into Effect”

New York City Sues Verizon in Contract Dispute

Long Island business contract lawyerNew York City’s continued wait for access to Verizon’s FiOS service has resulted in a lawsuit. Verizon promised the city in a 2008 contract to provide access to its fiber-optic FiOS service to all New York City residents by the year 2014. Three years later, Verizon has not come close to meeting the goal. The original contract was agreed upon by the parties in order to provide New York City residents more options for receiving affordable cable television service. Continue reading “New York City Sues Verizon in Contract Dispute”