A Person May Execute a First-Party Supplemental Needs Trust

Nassau County estate planning lawyerA person under 65 years old may create a first-party supplemental needs trust for income in excess of the monthly amount allowed by Medicaid. A person is entitled to fund this trust until the age of 65 years old and will be entitled to the resources in the trust until he or she dies. Furthermore, a first-party supplemental needs trust allows a person to designate a trustee to make payments on his or her behalf. It is worth noting that a trustee may be limited to the powers enumerated in the trust’s terms and conditions. Therefore, a person may choose to expand a trustee’s power or limit his or her power by setting forth specific guidelines.

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Navigating the Uncertainties for Long-Term Care Needs

Garden City Medicaid trust lawyerMedicare is a Federal program enacted in 1965. It is an earned-benefit program for those that are aged 65 or older or disabled. It consists of parts A, B, C and D. Part A is for hospital insurance coverage, as well as limited stays in nursing homes and some rehabilitative services such as physical, vocational, and speech therapy. Usually, there is no co-pay for Part A coverage. However, it is $167.50 per day for skilled nursing facility visits in excess of twenty-one days. Continue reading “Navigating the Uncertainties for Long-Term Care Needs”

Selling a Home in an Irrevocable Trust and Purchasing a Different Property

Garden City Medicaid trust lawyerAn irrevocable trust can be created to preserve assets in the event that a person requires long-term care through the Medicaid program, which is a primary payer of skilled nursing facility costs. In order to be eligible for the Medicaid program, an applicant must meet specific income and asset requirements. In most instances, individuals will transfer assets into a trust to ensure Medicaid eligibility. Normally, the transfer of assets is completed prior to an individual requiring long-term care assistance, because the assets must remain in the trust for five years in order for the Grantor to not be penalized or be caused ineligibility for Medicaid. Continue reading “Selling a Home in an Irrevocable Trust and Purchasing a Different Property”

Mortgaging A Property In A Trust

Many individuals wonder if they can obtain a mortgage on real property that is owned by a Medicaid trust. Unfortunately, a bank will not likely offer a mortgage or home equity line of credit for property that is in an irrevocable trust. However, in New York State, a Medicaid trust that is irrevocable can be revoked. This means that an individual has the ability to remove the real property from the trust in order to receive a mortgage or home equity line of credit on the property. However, consent must be obtained from the beneficiaries of the trust. Obtain consent from those who are beneficially interested must comply with strict requirements. For this reason, it is important to have an experienced attorney provide assistance. Continue reading “Mortgaging A Property In A Trust”